Motivations behind the "PeopleWords free invitations"

I have just recently upgraded PeopleWords (online platform for the translation business). Among various small fixes and improvements, PeopleWords now provides free invitations for the translators. If you’re not familiar with the “invitation feature” of PeopleWords (it happens that some people are not), then just have a look at our white paper. In this post, I will explain the (commercial) motivations underlying this feature. I have already explained (see my previous post) that there is a strong imbalance of risks in freelance translation jobs.

Additional goodies from the blog spammers

An interesting thing about running a web application, it’s that people never cease to surprise you. I have already discussed the behavior of the scammers within PeopleWords. Now, I am encountering a new kind of annoying people: the blog spammers. Given that PeopleWords.com has no blog, there is no reason for blog spammers to get interested in Peoplewords, right? Wrong, PeopleWords has no blog, but blog spammers don’t care.

Scammers going global leveraging freelance services

In my previous post, I was discussing the various trust issues that are encountered when dealing with an online community. I was discussing some issues related to translation jobs sabotage by scammers. My point was the risks in freelance translation jobs are much higher on the customer side than on the translator side. The main argument was it’s hard to turn a small translation job into cash. Well, scammers have more imagination that I have, and it seems that this argument is partially wrong.

Building a safe community for online translation works

This article focuses on the various issues related to online trust for freelance translation jobs and the various solutions adopted by freelance websites in this domain. As for all online activities, trust is a difficult yet critical element to obtain. My personal experience in this domain comes from the management of the PeopleWords website. The naive approach: the rating system Most freelance websites provide a rating system for all users (PeopleWords is no exception, see [1]).

A few marketing tips for online freelance translators from a customer view point

Let me get the point clear: I am not a translator, I have never step a foot into a translation agency and I know nothing about the translation business. But as a simple customer, I have had a large amount of interactions with many freelance translators (most of this experience is related to the setup of the PeopleWords website). Good online marketing is about sending positive signals to the customers.

A translator-friendly RESX file editor

A newer version of ResxEditor is now available, see my lastest blog post on this matter. In a previous post, I was giving some details on the RESX format from a translator-friendly viewpoint. Actually, after proof-testing the XML concept with a few translators, I came up with the conclusion The most brilliant Uzbek-Azeri translators do not speak XML. Do not seek any explanation, it’s just a fact. XML has a logic which is totally alien to the average translator.

Best practice for website design, sandboxing with ASP.Net

Why should I care? The web makes application deployment easier, but there is no magic web-effect that would prevent web designers of commiting the very same mistakes that regular developers commit while designing classical applications. In order to minimize the risks, I have found the notion of website sandboxing as a must-have for web designers. What is sandboxing? A sandbox is a place full of sand where children cannot cause any harm even if they intend to.

A translator guide to website translation

Since the publication of this post, I have released Resx Editor a free visual resource editor dedicated to translation works. In this post, I give a short introduction about website translation. The targeted audience is non-technical translators. I will focus on the particular case of website translation when relying on Microsoft XML Resource files. The big picture Dynamic websites include many things beside pure textual content (programming source code, images, stylesheets, …).

When numerical precision can hurt you

The objective was to cure a very deadly disease and the drug was tested on mice. The results were impressive since 33% of the mice survived while only 33% died (the last mouse escaped and its outcome was unknown). Numerical precision depends on the underlying number type. In .Net, there are 3 choices float (32bits), double (64bits) and decimal (128bits). Performance left aside, more precision cannot hurt, right? My answer is It depends.

Refactoring and logistics ("L'intendance suivra!")

With Eclipse and VS2005, refactoring is now a standard feature of modern IDEs. No more than few minutes are now sufficient to drastically change the internal structure of a software library. Yet, if software logistics cannot keep the pace then productivity bottlenecks of software evolution remain unchanged. De Gaulle said L’intendance suivra! (which could be poorly translated by “Logistics always keep up!”). Yet many european wars have been lost due to poor logistics, and, back to the discussion, I believe that logistics is no less important in software matters than it is in wars.